climateadaptation

climateadaptation:

The scale of coral reef destruction in south Florida is enormous. Nearly 50% of the coral reefs have died in the past two decades. And the problem is getting worse.

But why does this matter? The Key’s reefs are among the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world, and less coral has a cascading affect up the food chain. This affects the fishing and tourism industries, which (like it or not) makes Florida such a big draw. Coral reefs buffer coastal cities against storm surge, protecting countless real estate and businesses worth tens of billions. And in Florida Keys alone, there are over 33,000 jobs that depend on the reefs.

Check out PBS.org/climate-change. “The world’s ocean are absorbing carbon dioxide at an unprecedented rate and the resulting acidification is transforming marine ecosystems. We look at how ocean acidification is already affecting coral reefs in the Florida Keys.”

NOOO!!

climateadaptation
breakingnews:

Experts: Sea level rise of more than 3 feet possible by 2100
NBC News: Melting glaciers may push up global sea levels more than 3 feet by the end of this century, according to a scientific poll of experts. Such a rise could displace millions of people from low-lying countries such as Bangladesh. It could cost coastal mega-cities like New York and Tokyo billions for construction of sea walls and other infrastructure.
“The consequences are horrible,” says Jonathan Bamber, a glaciologist at the University of Bristol and co-author of the study published Jan. 6 in the journal “Nature Climate Change.”
Photo: Experts increasingly recognize that ice melting in Antarctica could push up sea levels dramatically higher in coming decades. (Alister Doyle / Reuters file)

breakingnews:

Experts: Sea level rise of more than 3 feet possible by 2100

NBC News: Melting glaciers may push up global sea levels more than 3 feet by the end of this century, according to a scientific poll of experts. Such a rise could displace millions of people from low-lying countries such as Bangladesh. It could cost coastal mega-cities like New York and Tokyo billions for construction of sea walls and other infrastructure.

“The consequences are horrible,” says Jonathan Bamber, a glaciologist at the University of Bristol and co-author of the study published Jan. 6 in the journal “Nature Climate Change.”

Photo: Experts increasingly recognize that ice melting in Antarctica could push up sea levels dramatically higher in coming decades. (Alister Doyle / Reuters file)

climateadaptation

climateadaptation:

New study confirms sea levels are rising faster along northern coastlines.

Scientists broadly agree that on a worldwide basis, sea level, already 8 inches higher than it was in 1900, is likely to go up by another 3 feet or so by the end of this century. That’s a global average.

However, depending on local conditions, the change could be less in some areas, and greater, along with a greater threat to life and property, in others.

The new study, which reinforces research published in Nature Climate Change last June, says that the northeastern U.S. falls into the “greater” category.

The increase was most evident at the eight stations with continuous records stretching back 75 years or more: Halifax, Nova Scotia; Portland, Maine; Boston; New York’s Battery; Sandy Hook and Atlantic City, N.J.; Baltimore, and Norfolk.

Eight more stations in the same region, with records going back  43 years, also showed acceleration, although the speedup was less clear due to the shorter observation period.

Climate Central

climateadaptation
climateadaptation:

“The amount of coral covering reefs there has been cut in half since 1985…” 
nbcnews:

Great Barrier Reef coral seeing ‘major decline,’ scientists report
(Photo: Great Barrier Reef / AFP - Getty Images file)
Calling it the most extensive review of how coral on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is faring, scientists on Monday reported some alarming news: The amount of coral covering reefs there has been cut in half since 1985 and will likely continue to decline unless steps are taken to at least attack the easiest of several factors.
Read the complete story.

climateadaptation:

The amount of coral covering reefs there has been cut in half since 1985…”

nbcnews:

Great Barrier Reef coral seeing ‘major decline,’ scientists report

(Photo: Great Barrier Reef / AFP - Getty Images file)

Calling it the most extensive review of how coral on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is faring, scientists on Monday reported some alarming news: The amount of coral covering reefs there has been cut in half since 1985 and will likely continue to decline unless steps are taken to at least attack the easiest of several factors.

Read the complete story.

adcollector

For all of my advertising, art, design, digital media, marketing, and even science majors! This is an awesome concept, and the execution really makes an impact. It’s great to think of your message with your emotions in mind, don’t you think?

check out the rest here-> http://copyranter.blogspot.com/2012/02/most-beautiful-print-ads-ever-produced.html

thepossibilitynotebook
Whether you believe in global warming or not, there’s still some pretty great information on the links provided. And like I always say, it’s best to inform yourself before you form an opinion.
thepossibilitynotebook:

Last year the world experienced historical events, from severe flooding and mudslides in Thailand and Pakistan, flash floods in Brazil, tropical storm in Philippines to a drought in East Africa, Chile’s Puyehue volcano eruption and the typhoon, earthquake and tsunami that hit east of Japan. In the United States alone, extreme weather ranged from 200+ tornado outbreaks in the southeastern states, Joplin EF-5 tornado, triple threat drought, heat and wildfires across the southern plains to the category one Hurricane Irene, and early season winter storms. The frequent question raised: Was this caused by global warming?
New Yorker writer, Elizabeth Kolbert’s in her article “Hurricane Irene and Global Warming: A Glimpse of the Future?” makes a good point. The answers to this question are usually weak to the point most of us forget about this environmental issue until the next disaster hits. She suggests we start asking a different question.
Instead of the standard question, “Was [Irene] caused by global warming?,” in which the answer ultimately concludes not one event can definitively contribute to climate change. How about, “Are more events like [Irene] be what one could expect in a warming world?” The answer here is a straightforward “yes.”
Learn more about global warming/climate change:
EPA Climate Change Basic Info Video
National Geographic article, Signs from Earth: Now What?
EPA Climate Change Indicators in the United States (full PDF report)

Whether you believe in global warming or not, there’s still some pretty great information on the links provided. And like I always say, it’s best to inform yourself before you form an opinion.

thepossibilitynotebook:

Last year the world experienced historical events, from severe flooding and mudslides in Thailand and Pakistan, flash floods in Brazil, tropical storm in Philippines to a drought in East Africa, Chile’s Puyehue volcano eruption and the typhoon, earthquake and tsunami that hit east of Japan. In the United States alone, extreme weather ranged from 200+ tornado outbreaks in the southeastern states, Joplin EF-5 tornado, triple threat drought, heat and wildfires across the southern plains to the category one Hurricane Irene, and early season winter storms. The frequent question raised: Was this caused by global warming?

New Yorker writer, Elizabeth Kolbert’s in her article Hurricane Irene and Global Warming: A Glimpse of the Future? makes a good point. The answers to this question are usually weak to the point most of us forget about this environmental issue until the next disaster hits. She suggests we start asking a different question.

Instead of the standard question, “Was [Irene] caused by global warming?,” in which the answer ultimately concludes not one event can definitively contribute to climate change. How about, “Are more events like [Irene] be what one could expect in a warming world?” The answer here is a straightforward “yes.”

Learn more about global warming/climate change:

ecoevolution

ecoevolution:

It has the biggest brain of any animal — a massive 18lb to our human 3lb — yet we really have no idea what it does with it.

This magnificent predator — at 65ft long, the greatest that has ever existed — spends 90 per cent of its life in the profound depths, able to dive deeper than any other animal.

For precisely that reason, it is the least studied of all the great whales.

And of all whales, it is under the greatest threat, too — from what we humans are doing to its environment. Only now are we beginning to understand these creatures. But is it too late?

carolinafrica
carolinafrica:

“For many of us, water simply flows from a faucet, and we think little about it beyond this point of contact. We have lost a sense of respect for the wild river, for the complex workings of a wetland, for the intricate web of life that water supports.” - Sandra Postel
         70% Of Our Plastic Waste Ends Up In The Sea :(((

carolinafrica:

“For many of us, water simply flows from a faucet, and we think little about it beyond this point of contact. We have lost a sense of respect for the wild river, for the complex workings of a wetland, for the intricate web of life that water supports.” - Sandra Postel

         70% Of Our Plastic Waste Ends Up In The Sea :(((