unconsumption
unconsumption:


Benjamin Yates creates futuristic looking cityscapes—think Blade Runner’s Los Angeles crossed with 60s retro-futurism—made from old electronic parts, like old circuit boards, and lights them up so they look all pretty and colorful.
He houses them inside perspex coffee tables, and they contain miniature people, old VCRs, and digital picture frames.
He calls them Electri-Cities and he’ll even produce them so they can play music and, incredibly, check your email. That’s right, a musical, dystopian coffee table that can check emails—that’s the sort of furniture anybody can get excited about.

(via These Coffee Tables Contain Futuristic Neon Cityscapes Made From Recycled Electronics | The Creators Project)

unconsumption:

Benjamin Yates creates futuristic looking cityscapes—think Blade Runner’s Los Angeles crossed with 60s retro-futurism—made from old electronic parts, like old circuit boards, and lights them up so they look all pretty and colorful.

He houses them inside perspex coffee tables, and they contain miniature people, old VCRs, and digital picture frames.

He calls them Electri-Cities and he’ll even produce them so they can play music and, incredibly, check your email. That’s right, a musical, dystopian coffee table that can check emails—that’s the sort of furniture anybody can get excited about.

(via These Coffee Tables Contain Futuristic Neon Cityscapes Made From Recycled Electronics | The Creators Project)

unconsumption
unconsumption:


Another self-contained product — in which the packaging *is* the product
Unconsumption reader Cody Boehmig saw our post about this box-turned-lamp, and was inspired to tell us about several of his projects, including his (prototype) “Utilitarian Wall Shelf” made from used cardboard:

It begins as a folded 11″ × 14″ rectangle. Prompted by the instructions on the packaging, the user unfolds it [the packaging, which is a piece of scored, used cardboard] into a flat shape, and then folds it up into a shelf with the help of an easy-to-use letter-matching system. The nails that hold the shelf to the wall also hold the folded shelf together. The final shelf space is 11″ × 7″ and is sturdy enough to comfortably support a full load of average-sized books.

[Thx, Cody!]

unconsumption:

image

Another self-contained product — in which the packaging *is* the product

Unconsumption reader Cody Boehmig saw our post about this box-turned-lamp, and was inspired to tell us about several of his projects, including his (prototype) “Utilitarian Wall Shelf” made from used cardboard:

It begins as a folded 11″ × 14″ rectangle. Prompted by the instructions on the packaging, the user unfolds it [the packaging, which is a piece of scored, used cardboard] into a flat shape, and then folds it up into a shelf with the help of an easy-to-use letter-matching system. The nails that hold the shelf to the wall also hold the folded shelf together. The final shelf space is 11″ × 7″ and is sturdy enough to comfortably support a full load of average-sized books.

[Thx, Cody!]

recopilacionesdiy
montse-sunyer:

You think you could use a computer desk but you don’t really want to spend he money on something like this? You don’t have to because now you can make your own desk by using pallets. For this particular one all you need is a pallet, some sturdy legs and a plywood sheet. It’s a fun and easy project and at the end you’ll have an original computer desk. It’s easy, cheap and functional.{found on ikeahackers}

montse-sunyer:

You think you could use a computer desk but you don’t really want to spend he money on something like this? You don’t have to because now you can make your own desk by using pallets. For this particular one all you need is a pallet, some sturdy legs and a plywood sheet. It’s a fun and easy project and at the end you’ll have an original computer desk. It’s easy, cheap and functional.{found on ikeahackers}